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Vectrex Timeline - What happened 30 years ago... ?

May 1, 2012

 

April of 1982:

Paul Newell finishes several Games for the Vectrex:  Mine Storm, Berzerk, Scramble, Rip Off, and Star Trek were all completed at the same time.

 

Scramble was an arcade game released in 1981. It was a scrolling shooter that put the player(s) in a series of areas with different landscapes to navigate through.  Mine Storm is the built-in game that came with every Vectrex unit. In Berzerk obviously there is going to be a difference in graphics, due to the majority of the Vectrex version being in vector (the original was in raster). Star Trek had several brief appearances in the 1982 movie Android, which the character of Max 404 (played by Don Keith Opper) was playing it. His creator, Dr. Daniel (played by Klaus Kinski), would later lament in the movie that the games were "driving him (Max) crazy".

 

Come back to the VecNews, this series will be continued!


Demo for the Vectrex won 1 place!

May 1, 2012

Students at CMU's Computer Club obviously don't see much reason for preservation if it stops them from creating demos like the one below, which recently won first place at PixelJam, a demo competition taking place at Ohio arts and technology conference Notacon. Since no compositional software exists for the system, esteemed chip musician C-Jeff composed and ported over the music from a ZX Spectrum, which has the same sound chip as the Vectrex. They then ran the resulting audio through a preamp to eliminate the harsh buzzing sound that gets mixed into the signal due to the machine's screen. The tripod camcorder recording doesn't quite fully capture the cathode rays' hypnotic glow, but since the console has no video outputs it's the closest you're going to get without owning one of these rare machines.
 
 
 
Click the image to view the demo...


madtronix is coming back!

April 14, 2012

John "madtronix" is coming back! updates soon...


Vectrex | Wiki Mirror at vectrexmuseum.com

March 17, 2012

 

Today is the launch of the Vectrexmuseum's mirror version of Darryl B's Vectrex wiki under the URL vectrexmuseum.com/wiki. All articles written by Darryl have been mirrored to this wiki and will be maintained by Darryl in the future. So far we have 90 Vectrex related articles online, including GCE and homebrew game reviews, biographies; including an authorized biography of Jay Smith, company profiles and Vectrex trivia.

The mirror version has been set up to save the important content that Darryl and the other wiki authors created in the case that wikia stops their free services. We encourage all wikia Vectrex wiki authors to sign up also at the museum´s mirror wiki and maintain the page. Please contact Oliver (wiki system admin) to get an author account.

We got a mail from the first official visitor:

Posted Image
Please visit the new vectrexmuseum.com/wiki

Greetings,

Darryl B. and Oliver,
the wiki admins

 


Vectrex Timeline - What happened 30 years ago... ?

February 7, 2012

Here is the second entry for the series about the history of the Vectrex.

 

First months of 1982:

A strict timetable demands that the first 12 games and the hardware should be ready in June 1982.  The Vectrex name is subsequently chosen, as already described.

John Hall later exclusively works on "Mine Storm" while Gerry Karr works on The Executive alone.  Gerry starts over from scratch and changes the name to the RUM (Run Time Monitor).  In the end, a number of people contribute to the RUM, most notably Duncan Muirhead who handled most of the heavy trig stuff.

 

 

Come back to the VecNews, this series will be continued!


VGDB - Vectrex Game Database - relaunched

February 1, 2012

 

Many of us have missed the VGDB - Vectrex Game Database since it disappeared more than six months ago. At the Vectrex Google Usergroup there was a long discussion of relaunching the website. Manu, the original founder sadly had no copy of the page but luckily there was a backup at webarchive.org. I got the permission by Manu to relaunch the page at vectrexmuseum.com

A Museum preserves important data - so I thought about recovering the most missed Vectrex pages. Today the series starts with the relaunch of the updated Vectrex Game Database. Other lost pages will follow.

I invested four days in recovering the page and need a little rest - so I added a
Tell a friend function so you can easily spread the word about the new VGDB. Please help me by telling your five best Vectrex friends about the relaunched VGDB.

And now... the big moment we have been waiting for:

relaunch VGDB at http://www.vectrexmuseum.com/mirror/vgdb/

Have fun,

Oliver


Vectrex Timeline - What happened 30 years ago... ?

January 28, 2012

Here is the first entry for a news series about the history of the Vectrex.

 

December 1980:
Large supply of 5" CRT's bought cheaply from a liquidator's surplus.
Spring 1981:
"Mini-Arcade" development begins with Mike Purvis and John Ross.
Spring 1981:
Project is re-named. Tom Sloper suggests "Vector-X", which soon becomes "Vectrex".
July 1981:
Kenner declines an option on the project.
September 1981:
Vectrex concept is licensed by General Consumer Electronics (GCE), and a 9" CRT is decided on.
October 1981:
Paul Newell, Mark Indictor and John Hall begin to engineer the Vectrex.
January 1982:
Bill Hawkins and Chris King join the Western Tech. They were both students at Georgia Tech at the time and are hired by Ed Smith as "Cooperative Education" students. They are supposed to work for three months and then go back to school. Duncan Muirhead joins a week or two afterwards. He had just dropped out of a Physics PHD program at UCLA.

 

Come back to the VecNews, this series will be continued!


Vectrex Museum presents VecApp

January 19, 2012


Vectrex Museum is proud to present the first Vectrex Locator web-app for mobile phones: VecApp.
Please open www.vectrexmuseum.com/mobile/ with your mobile device, then tap “Add to Bookmarks” for easy, one-tap access. More information about VecApp here.

What the hack is a web-app ?

The web-app resides on server and is accessed via the Internet. It performs specified tasks - potentially all the same ones as a native application - for the mobile user, usually by downloading part of the application to the device for local processing each time it is used. The software is written as Web pages in HTML and CSS, with the interactive parts in Java. This means that the same application can be used by most mobile devices that can surf the Web (regardless of the brand of phone).

Background Picture Contest

Create a start screen background picture for VecApp.

Simple rules: The picture needs to be related to the Vectrex. Use your computer, a pencil or anything else to create a 310 (h) x 320 (w) pixel resolution picture. Please mention the three location buttons that cover parts of your picture.

One picture per person, please send in your picture until February 29, 2012 to the email address: curator@vectrexmuseum.com. All pictures will be published for the contest that runs in March 2012 here at vectrexmuseum.com. The five most voted pictures will be included on the VecApp start screen and shown in a random order.

Download a PhotoShop template

Please promote VecApp on your website, here is a press kit


Crossword Puzzles - GCE Vectrex

January 18, 2012

DOWN
1: Designed by Bill Hawkins
2: This arcade game was released exclusively on the Vectrex
4: This 3D device package with 3D Mine Strom
5: Modern day programmer of Vectrex Games
6: The final game for the light pen
7: Availbale only through GCE mail order
8: You are a vacuum cleaner
11: Based on the vector coin-op of the same name
12: This toy company bought out General Consumer Electronics
13: This cartridge had 2k of ram housed within
14: European release of Spinball
15: Rumored game title
16: This gentleman built the Vectrex prototype
19: This toy company chose not to purchase the Vectrex
23: Leather accessory for the Vectrex
26: Based on the television show and movie franchise
27: 12 K prototype
29: Evil Otto!
32: The Vectrex was first displayed during this Chicago convention

ACROSS
3: The Japanese manufacturer of the Vectrex
9: Packaged with Artmaster; Only 3 games were compatable with this device
10: Submarine game
17: Graphics were created with these type of lines instead of pixels
18: Used for diagnostic purposes
20: X's & O's
21: Vectrex Manufacturer
22: This game went from home to the arcade
24: Built in game
25: Ricocheting fire
28: This game used the joysticks analog feature
30: European release of Web Wars
31: Used to simulate color
32: Announced but never released add-on
33: Voice synthesis

 

 

 

 

by www.gooddealgames.com

 

Print the crossword | download as a PDF


Asteroids Locator Map USA

January 18, 2012

Asteroids Locator Map USA

 

Much of arcade Asteroids’s allure is the glowing, minimalist vector screen. Instead of a standard TV monitor, which scans from top to bottom over and over again, the vector display draws straight lines from one point to the next where needed, like an oscilloscope. It can only be a simple polygon outline of one color, but it also means that the image is sharp and bright (Asteroids’s photon torpedoes leave a brilliant trace along the slowly-decaying phosphor of the screen), and simple to program (the video and sound data in the arcade version of Asteroids is just 2 KB of ROM code, and the game program is another 6 KB). It’s why www.atariasteroids.net have the Asteroids locator on the site: to this day, no home version or variation of Asteroids really does the same thing.


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